Rooms

Rooms

All our rooms are ensuite with either extremely comfortable double or twin beds. To make your stay in our accommodation as relaxing as possible we have included TV with Freeview, Wi-Fi, tea and coffee making facilities.  The bathrooms are luxuriously appointed with power shower, fluffy towels and complimentary toiletries.

After a good night’s rest enjoy a traditional cooked or continental breakfast. Some car parking is available – please ask when booking.

Easier and faster ways to book online!

You can either book using Booking.com or via our website here.

Booking multiple rooms for weddings and other events

If you have a wedding or other large event in the local area that requires accommodation get in touch and we may be able to offer you a discounted rate.  Give us a ring on 01495 723319.

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ROOM 1

The Rhys Davies Room

The Rhys Davies Room

Single & double occupancy from £69.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

Trained as Millwright and Engineer here at Tredegar during the early 19th century, Rhys Davies would later serve in the Army’s Corps of Engineers and then construct ironworks in France. In 1833 he was commissioned to design and build an ironworks at Richmond Virginia, USA, named ‘Tredegar’ by its proprietors in honour of the Welsh town that produced him.

Richmond’s new works would radically affect US history, enabling the town to become the Capital of the Confederacy and its Tredegar Works the South’s major Civil War arsenal. The first shot of the conflict was fired against Fort Sumter from a Tredegar cannon, and much of the equipment used by Southern armies bore this name.

Ironically US iron and steel works inspired by Richmond’s Tredegar would eventually lead to the closure of many in Wales.

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ROOM 2

The Aneurin Room

The Aneurin Room

Single & double occupancy from £69.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

Born in 1897, Aneurin Bevan began work aged 13 in a local coal mine. Self-education centred upon Tredegar’s Workmens’ Library inspired strong Left Wing political beliefs and involvement leading to a scholarship at London’s Central Labour College.

His severe childhood stutter overcome through great personal effort, Bevan’s speaking and other abilities brought him office as Miners’ Lodge Chairman and both Town and County Councilor before election in 1929 as Labour Member of Parliament for the Ebbw Vale Constituency. Appointed Minister of Health in Attlee’s 1946 Labour Government, Bevan introduced the UK’s National Health Service modelled upon established organisations of which Tredegar’s Medical Aid Society was an example.

Following his death in 1960, Aneurin Bevan’s ashes would be scattered on local hills where he had so often walked.

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ROOM 3

The Elizabeth Davies Room

The Elizabeth Davies Room

Single & twin occupancy from £79.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

Elizabeth Davies, wife of Tredegar Works’ Manager Richard P. Davies, was responsible for the town’s celebrated clock tower. In 1857 Mrs Davies proposed placing a water fountain in The Circle but decided instead upon a clock tower, perhaps inspired by that at London’s Palace of Westminster.

Some £1000 was required – then a vast sum – but sadly Elizabeth Davies died before her proposed fund-raising bazaar was held. However the target was reached through donations, the bulk apparently being a massive contribution made by her bereaved husband.

Tredegar’s iron clock tower in an iron-making town officially commemorated the Duke of Wellington whose wars had helped create it, but it may also be regarded as a grieving man’s memorial to his beloved wife.

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ROOM 4

The Sirhowy Room

The Sirhowy Room

Single & twin occupancy from £69.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

As with many Welsh place names, the original meaning of ‘Sirhowy’ has been lost after generations of slurring and mistranslation. Prehistoric man and Roman soldier certainly knew this region and over the centuries battles were fought between warring tribes and races. Once belonging to the mediaeval Welsh kingdom of Gwent, this upper valley would become part of Bedwellty Parish.

By late 18th century the valley’s rich iron and coal seams were being exploited by Sirhowy and Tredegar Iron Works, dramatically changing a remote region of subsistence-level farms whose living standards had probably altered little since prehistoric times. Once visited mainly by lowland gentlemen shooting grouse, the arrival of industry altered and despoiled Sirhowy’s landscape but bestowed prosperity hitherto unknown.

Coal pits and steel works have vanished but beneath the new greenery remain traces of an era when this upper valley influenced the world.

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ROOM 5

The Bedwellty Room

The Bedwellty Room

Single & double occupancy from £69.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

In 1800 Samuel Homfray senior was one of three men who created the town of Tredegar Iron Works. When Sirhowy Ironmasters Monkhouse & Fothergill wished to expand onto lands owned by Newport’s Tredegar Estate, Homfray was an ideal choice as partner, both from the industrial expertise gained by operating Merthyr’s Penydarren Works and his marriage to the daughter of Sir Charles Morgan, Tredegar Estates proprietor. The result was a new works and town laid out to Homfray’s grid-iron design and named after the estate on which it stood, one whose impact British and World development would be considerable.

In 1818 Sam Homfray junior took over from his father with the result that, for more than half a century, Tredegar was controlled by a family who were regarded as benevolent and highly respected patrons.

Bedwellty House was the Homfray family’s residence.

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ROOM 6

The Chartist (Family) Room

The Chartist Room

Single & family occupancy from £69.50
Which includes a freshly cooked full English breakfast

Chartists were supporters of the 1836 “Working mens’ Charter”, a list of six political demands that found ready listeners throughout all industrial areas. Soon dividing into persuasive “Moral Force” and more violent “Physical Force” factions, the latter became dominant under leaders with revolutionary and republican aims.

On November 9th 1839 John Frost, Zephania Williams and William Jones led a secret army comprising many thousands of Monmouthshire Chartists to seize Newport and trigger a UK-wide uprising, failing when confronted by 28 soldiers stationed in the town’s Westgate Hotel, its local leaders sentenced to death for Treason although instead transported to Tasmania, Chartism seemed to have failed, but five of its six points are now part of the British political system with only a demand for annual Parliaments missing.

Had this militant Chartist revolution succeeded Britain would have become a very different country.